Philipson and Windermere Genealogy

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Resources and Advice

Please note all the downloads on this site are copyright. You may download one copy for yourself. If anyone else would like this information, direct them to this page.

With the exception of the list of inhabitants in 1675 which is from my dissertation, all these are working documents. None of them claim to be accurate or complete. Sometimes sources are missing, and sometimes I’ve forgotten what notes mean myself! I am making them available because I think even with these shortcomings, they are a unique resource for anyone interested in family history in this part of the world or in the Philipsons.  Click to download a file.

There is some advice on researching the Philipsons and other Windermere families below. (I would put a page jump here but so far I haven’t figured out how to do it).

Phildata1 1332-1661  
Phildata2 1661-1799
Phildata3 1800-1930

These are lists of the names of all the individual Philipsons I have come across in my research.

Windermere All Tenements

This is a list of all the tenements in Windermere and what information I could find about their ownership between 1640 and 1841.

Windermere Inhabitants 1675

This is a list of inhabitants of Windermere in 1675 and where they were living

Manor call list 1672
List of Boatmen and their families 1678

Taken from the papers of Sir Daniel Fleming

Family trees

Philipson trees 

By permission. No claim to be accurate or complete. Dick Wivell’s amazing family tree of all the early Philipson families and his own branch (bobbin makers of Staveley).

Strickland Philipsons

This is an attempt to make sense of parish register entries in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.  Dick Wivell and I independently came up with similar hypotheses about this family, and we think we found to a link to Dick’s branch, though not to the clockmaking Philipsons. This is an interesting tree because it is the oldest tree relating to branches not clearly related to the Calgarth and Crooke Philipsons. Not guaranteed to be accurate or complete. Thanks to Dick Wivell.

Clockmaking Philipson tree

Includes the Westgarth Phillipsons.

Descendants of John and Mary Philipson

This is a very large tree starting in 1723 and including Philipsons in Crosthwaite and Lyth, Levens, Ulthwaite, Langdale and Egton. Part of it has been matched with and supplemented by the research of Karl Philipson, other parts have not been confirmed and do not always agree with trees on the internet. It’s therefore very important that if you want to use the information here, you should check it yourself.

Advice on researching the Philipsons and other Windermere families

Philipson or Phillipson is a very unusual surname, as you will see if you look in the GRO index. There are groups in South Lancashire, Durham and the North East and in North Westmorland, but most of the others originate in the Windermere area and have spread out from there, including some branches in other parts of the country. The essential source for this family up to about 1700 are the two articles by Terence Fahey in the Transactions of the Cumberland and Westmorland Archaeological and Antiquarian Society (CWAAS) in 1963 and 1973. Fahey’s research largely replaced that of E.W. Brundskill, who first wrote about the Philipsons in the Westmorland Gazette. You can find her article at http://www.northofthesands.org.uk/westmoreland/pdf/brunskill.pdf

If you would like to see some of the original references to the Philipsons or other Windermere families,  then you can access the ‘Records of Kendale ‘ online at  http://www.british-history.ac.uk/kendale-barony/ -please note, this is not a link, but you can paste it in your browser.  Look up Windermere or neighbouring manors and you will find extracts from the manor records, rentals, and other snippets which give an interesting insight into life in the area from about the fourteenth century onwards. Don’t forget that until the nineteenth century you will usually need to search by the names of the townships, Undermillbeck (the area around Bowness) and Applethwaite (the area around Windermere). You may also find entries under Troutbeck.

When you get to the seventeenth century, parish registers are available, and also wills for Kendal Deanery. Up to 1749 these are available on microfiche at Kendal Record Office,(KRO) but after that they are held at Preston in Lancashire Record Office. However, an index is available online. You can also look for names in the Kendal Indictment Book, the hearth tax 1674 and window tax returns 1777, and also the Land tax returns of 1823 and 1831 (ref. WQ/R LT), all available at Kendal Record Office. A 1692 poll tax and 1722 land tax return have survived for Applethwaite.  In addition to the parish registers, there are the Windermere parish records (St Martin’s) which will give information about churchwardens, vestrymen, overseers of the poor and those in receipt of poor relief.  Quaker records are held at the National Archives, but I have copies which I will transcribe when I have time. If you are interested, the reference is PRO RG 6 1595.  If you have time to look through them, there are two sets of family papers with references to families in Windermere – The Le Fleming Papers and the Papers of Browne of Town End. The best way of dealing with these is to go online to the National Archives site – sorry, it’s changed since I last did this so you will have to navigate yourself – and search for your surname or place name.  Windermere manor records are all at Carlisle amongst the Lonsdale papers, although you will occasionally find rentals and other bits of information in odd places, such as the Records of Kendale or the Fleming papers.  From 1837 onwards civil registration., and from 1841 the national censuses, make searching much easier.  Locally, there are directories such as Mannex and Parson and White, and of course, newspapers.  However, I am not an expert on this period.

There are two books with biographies of the clockmaking Philipson family – a chapter in Brian Loomes ‘Westmorland Clockmakers’, which is now out of print but you might find in a library, and Brian Cave Brown Cave’s book on Jonas Barber, although he gets the pedigree wrong.

Good hunting!